From Sicily to Sweden: Lessons in History and Environmental Humanities

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In 2019 Lizzy Privitera was a visiting Ph.D. scholar and C.M. Lerici Foundation fellow at the KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory of KTH Royal Institute of Technology of Stockholm (Sweden).

In this brief blog piece she tells us about her cultural, professional and personal experience in Sweden.

Discover her project and her life in Sweden here!

Annunci

“Den återlämnade flickan” (“L’Arminuta”)

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In 2019 Bokförlaget Polaris received the C.M. Lerici Foundation literature support for the publication of “Den återlämnade flickan” (“L’Arminuta”, Einaudi editore) by Donatella Di Pietrantonio.

The book was translated from Italian to Swedish by Johanna Hedenberg, the Swedish translator of Elena Ferrante.

Set against the stark, beautiful landscape of Abruzzo in central Italy, this is a compelling story about mothers and daughters, about responsibility, siblings, and caregiving. Without warning or explanation, an unnamed 13-year-old girl is sent away from the family she has always thought of as hers to live with her birth family: a large, chaotic assortment of individuals whom she has never met and who seem anything but welcoming. Thus begins a new life, one of struggle, tension, and conflict, especially between the young girl and her mother. But in her relationship with Adriana and Vincenzo, two of her newly acquired siblings, she will find the strength to start again and to build a new and enduring sense of self.

Born in Teramo Province, Abruzzo, Donatella Di Pietrantonio completed her studies in the provincial capital, Aquila, and now lives in Penne. Her short fiction has been published by Granta Italy, and her novel, “Bella mia”, was nominated for the Strega Prize and won the Brancati Prize. “Den återlämnade flickan”, her third novel, won the Campiello Prize.

Do you want to read the book?
You can find it at this link:
https://www.bokforlagetpolaris.se/den-aterlaemnade-flickan/t-0/9789177950653

Enjoy the reading!

Why study in Italy?

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You should be an international student to Italy because Italy speaks many languages: beyond the renowned expertise in the language of the Architecture, Arts, Design and Fashion, Italy is very fluent in the language of Research and Science.

It all started under the arcades of Italian Universities that have always been driven by its passion for Research and Innovation. Italy proudly holds the highest rate record of academic publications on research magazines of excellence in Europe, with a focus on biology, natural sciences, physics, pharmacy, medicine, mathematics and computer science. Italian researchers and professors are highly appreciated and hired in the most renowned International Universities.

With 61 vibrant public universities, 30 private universities and 11 public research organizations, groundbreaking university programs, AFAM (Centers for higher artistic education) and 339 courses held in English,  Italy will teach you more than Italian.

Then why study in Italy?
  • Excellence in Research, Science and Creativity
  • Outstanding educational system based on solid notions, scientific method and creative approach
  • Development of complex problem solving, critical thinking and flexibility
  • Wide offer of courses also in English in a dynamic and pleasant environment

 

Study in Sweden

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As you know C.M. Lerici Foundation supports cultural and scientific exchange between Sweden and Italy. The Foundation provides scholarships for Italian and Swedish citizens who want to carry out study and research projects in Italy or Sweden in a wide range of subjects.

If you are an Italian student and you would like to spend a period in a Swedish University, here there are some useful information.

5 reasons to study in Sweden

It’s sustainable, innovative and home to the Nobel Prize. Here are five reasons why studying in Sweden is a great idea:

WELCOME!

Welcome to the C.M. Lerici Foundation website!

The Foundation provides cultural and scientific exchange between Sweden and Italy.

It was established by the Italian industrialist Carlo Maurilio Lerici in the late 1950s in connection with the inauguration of the new Italian Cultural Institute in Stockholm.

The Foundation provides:

  • Scholarships for Italian and Swedish citizens who want to carry out study and research projects in Italy or Sweden in a wide range of subjects;
  • Contributions for Italian and Swedish publishing houses.